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The population of Nepal are vulnerable to injuries from natural disasters as well as those occurring in the home, at work and on the roads. The recent significant investment in road construction and rapid increases in vehicle numbers has increased the risk of road traffic injuries. The aim of this study was to identify and summariseall published literature reporting injuries to people of any age resident in Nepal. Injuries of any cause and events resulting in any type of injury were included.

We conducted a systematic literature review following published guidance. We developed a sensitive search strategy to identify studies using a range of different study designs. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted for four other electronic databases. Potentially eligible citations were screened by title and abstract and full texts of relevant studies were obtained for further assessment. Data were extracted by two researchers. The included studies were summarised narratively by injury type and study design.

We found many more publications than we expected to, showing that there is an increasing interest in injury research. However, we noted that many publications reported small hospital case series. These types of studies may underestimate the true burden of injuries as not every patient attends a hospital after their injury. The full results of our review have now been submitted for publication in a journal. When the study has been published, we will post a copy of the research on this website.

The population of Nepal are vulnerable to injuries from natural disasters as well as those occurring in the home, at work and on the roads. The recent significant investment in road construction and rapid increases in vehicle numbers has increased the risk of road traffic injuries. The aim of this study was to identify and summariseall published literature reporting injuries to people of any age resident in Nepal. Injuries of any cause and events resulting in any type of injury were included.

We conducted a systematic literature review following published guidance. We developed a sensitive search strategy to identify studies using a range of different study designs. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted for four other electronic databases. Potentially eligible citations were screened by title and abstract and full texts of relevant studies were obtained for further assessment. Data were extracted by two researchers. The included studies were summarised narratively by injury type and study design.

We found many more publications than we expected to, showing that there is an increasing interest in injury research. However, we noted that many publications reported small hospital case series. These types of studies may underestimate the true burden of injuries as not every patient attends a hospital after their injury.